Falu Rödfärg External Wood Paint

Falu Rödfärg External Wood Paint

Availability: In stock

The history of Swedish red paint can be traced right back to the 16th century and today it is as natural a choice for architect-designed detached houses and public buildings as for summer cottages and boathouses.


Below you can read here about the properties that have made Falu Rödfärg Sweden’s most tried and tested – and most loved – house paint.


Falu Rödfärg – Swedish Red paint its use, is only limited by your imagination from barns, bird boxes and raised beds to interior feature walls, fences and external facades.



Please note for small quantities sent via parcel courier these will come in plain screw cap containers to limit damage in transit.  

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the colour and texture of products on this website but due to the limitations of technology, we strongly recommend that sample products are purchased for testing in situ prior to the full order being placed.

Falun Wood Paint - 100ml Sample - Red

£3.50 (Excl. VAT)

Falun Wood Paint - 100ml Sample - Black

£5.25 (Excl. VAT)

Falun Wood Paint - 5 Litres - Original Red

£40.00 (Excl. VAT)

Falun Wood Paint - 5 Litres - Black

£50.00 (Excl. VAT)

Falun Wood Paint - 10 Litres - Original Red

£70.00 (Excl. VAT)

Falun Wood Paint - 10 Litres - Black

£93.50 (Excl. VAT)
Description

Details

Falu Rödfärg is not just a house paint, it is Swedish cultural history in a tin. The history of Swedish red paint can be traced right back to the 16th century and today it is as natural a choice for architect-designed detached houses and public buildings as for summer cottages and boathouses. You can read here about the properties that have made Falu Rödfärg Sweden’s most tried and tested – and most loved – house paint.

The pigment: Falu Rödfärg contains pigment from the mineralization of the Falun Mine. “Red mull” is created from ore with a low copper content that has decomposed over the centuries. In addition to copper, red mull contains a rare compound of iron ochre, silica and zinc.

This results in a paint with a beautiful, matt finish and a translucent surface with course silicon dioxide crystals that reflect rays of light. In warm evening light, the red colour becomes intense and almost glows. The pigment is also highly stable in terms of light, houses can be found that have not been painted for 100 years and yet the few remaining pigment granules are still nice and red.
Falu Rödfärg has a high pigment content: 18%

The coat of paint: Falu Rödfärg is a distemper, one of Sweden’s oldest and most used types of paint. The paint produces an open coat that allows the wood to breathe – it lets in moisture, but allows it to evaporate again equally quickly. This minimises the risk of rot.

The colour:Falu Rödfärg’s classic colour is not available as an exact paint number that can be mixed in a machine. The colour is as alive as the experts who burn the pigment. It is a craft that has been handed down in our production process since we started serious pigment manufacture in the mine area in 1764. An experienced Swedish user of red paint knows that it is a natural product and that it is therefore best to change batch at the corner of the house just to be sure.

Available in Red or Black


Please note for small quantities sent via parcel courier these will come in plain screw cap containers to limit damage in transit.

Technical Documents
View FileFalu Rodfarg External Wood Paint - Safety Data Sheet    Size: (1.01 MB)
View FileFalu Rodfarg External Wood Paint - Technical Sheet    Size: (2.25 MB)
View FileFalu Tech Sheet    Size: (1.62 MB)
Application Advice

Maintenance: Falu Rödfärg is very simple to maintain. As the paint ages, the binder weakens and the pigment granules are finally so loosely attached to the surface that you can simply brush them off and repaint without using a scraper. The fact that the pigment comes off granule by granule also means that the frontage ages with charm, without flaking and becoming unattractive. It is precisely the fact that the pigment adheres almost mechanically on the surface that explains why Falu Rödfärg should only be used on rough surfaces.

Coverage: Falu Rödfärg covers well and should be applied in thin coats. When painting new, untreated timber you should apply two coats. For the first coat dilute the paint with 10-20% water. After 24 hours you can finish off with undiluted paint. NB! Paint may not adhere to nail heads and knots after one coat, however, these are covered after the second coat.

Coating capacity: 3m2 / liter

Solvent and binder: Falu Rödfärg is and has always been a ”natural product” with a very low environmental load. The binder is starch glue and linseed oil. The solvent is water, which makes it easy to clean brushes and tools in ordinary water and a small amount of washing-up liquid.

ALWAYS READ THE PAINTING ADVICE ON THE TIN!

New, untreated timber of pine or spruce should first be primed with a coat of Falu Rödfärg diluted with 15-20% water. This should be followed by a coat with undiluted paint. Cover thinly, the paint should be worked into the wood. Coats that are too thick can cause the paint to flake.
Cover over foundations, down pipes, paving slabs and windows with board or plastic. If possible leave the cover in place for about 1 week if there is a risk of rain. The paint can run in strong rain, we therefore recommend that paving slabs are not laid right up to the house wall but leave a couple of decimetres with an alternative filling material.

Weather
Do not apply to surfaces that have been exposed to strong sunlight or to wet wood (the moisture content of the wood should be less than 15%, ask your timber supplier). The lowest air temperature for painting is +5°C. Also avoid painting if there is any risk of night frost. If there is a risk of mildew spores in the wood, it should be treated with an anti-mould agent.

Discolouring mould (black dots)
Use some form of facade wash, anti-mould agent, and follow the instructions on the bottle. Available at paint retailers.

It is important to wash off algae or mould before painting! If there is any mould left on the frontage the paint acts as nourishment for the mould and the wall is soon covered in black dots again.

How does mould occur?
Wood must be stored in a protected place. If it is lying directly on the ground or under a tarpaulin there is a major risk of mould starting to grow. Rot can also develop if the timber is stored wet, out in rain. Moisture in the soil also contributes to mould starting to grow.
Paint is not a means of control and cannot provide guaranteed protection against mould.
The problem has increased in that we are having wetter summers and longer periods of warmer and damper autumns and winters.

To bear in mind
Check that the frontage is free of mould and/or algae. Wash the frontage as per the above if necessary.

Falu Rödfärg should be applied in thin coats that are worked into the wood. If it is too thick there is a risk of the paint flaking when it has dried.
Does the paint seem too thick? Dilute it with a small amount of water.
Does the paint seem too thin? The consistency of the paint can vary, this is usually due to the quality of the starch that is used as binder. The paint is equally good to use.

Repainting
It is important that the coat of paint has time to age and start to whiten (the pigment becomes loose on the frontage) before you repaint. If you repaint too often there is a risk of the coat of paint becoming too thick and the wall can start to flake.
When you have to repaint, it is sufficient with one coat of Falu Rödfärg.

Benefits

The pigment: Falu Rödfärg contains pigment from the mineralization of the Falun Mine. “Red mull” is created from ore with a low copper content that has decomposed over the centuries. In addition to copper, red mull contains a rare compound of iron ochre, silica and zinc.

This results in a paint with a beautiful, matt finish and a translucent surface with course silicon dioxide crystals that reflect rays of light. In warm evening light, the red colour becomes intense and almost glows. The pigment is also highly stable in terms of light, houses can be found that have not been painted for 100 years and yet the few remaining pigment granules are still nice and red.
Falu Rödfärg has a high pigment content: 18%

The coat of paint: Falu Rödfärg is a distemper, one of Sweden’s oldest and most used types of paint. The paint produces an open coat that allows the wood to breathe – it lets in moisture, but allows it to evaporate again equally quickly. This minimises the risk of rot.

 

Coating capacity: 3m2 / liter

FAQs

The pigment: Falu Rödfärg contains pigment from the mineralization of the Falun Mine. “Red mull” is created from ore with a low copper content that has decomposed over the centuries. In addition to copper, red mull contains a rare compound of iron ochre, silica and zinc.

This results in a paint with a beautiful, matt finish and a translucent surface with course silicon dioxide crystals that reflect rays of light. In warm evening light, the red colour becomes intense and almost glows. The pigment is also highly stable in terms of light, houses can be found that have not been painted for 100 years and yet the few remaining pigment granules are still nice and red. Falu Rödfärg has a high pigment content: 18%

The coat of paint: Falu Rödfärg is a distemper, one of Sweden’s oldest and most used types of paint. The paint produces an open coat that allows the wood to breathe – it lets in moisture, but allows it to evaporate again equally quickly. This minimises the risk of rot.

The colour:Falu Rödfärg’s classic colour is not available as an exact paint number that can be mixed in a machine. The colour is as alive as the experts who burn the pigment. It is a craft that has been handed down in our production process since we started serious pigment manufacture in the mine area in 1764. An experienced Swedish user of red paint knows that it is a natural product and that it is therefore best to change batch at the corner of the house just to be sure.

Maintenance: Falu Rödfärg is very simple to maintain. As the paint ages, the binder weakens and the pigment granules are finally so loosely attached to the surface that you can simply brush them off and repaint without using a scraper. The fact that the pigment comes off granule by granule also means that the frontage ages with charm, without flaking and becoming unattractive. It is precisely the fact that the pigment adheres almost mechanically on the surface that explains why Falu Rödfärg should only be used on rough surfaces.

Coverage: Falu Rödfärg covers well and should be applied in thin coats. When painting new, untreated timber you should apply two coats. For the first coat dilute the paint with 10-20% water. After 24 hours you can finish off with undiluted paint. NB! Paint may not adhere to nail heads and knots after one coat, however, these are covered after the second coat.

Solvent and binder: Falu Rödfärg is and has always been a ”natural product” with a very low environmental load. The binder is starch glue and linseed oil. The solvent is water, which makes it easy to clean brushes and tools in ordinary water and a small amount of washing-up liquid.

Technical Information

The pigment

Falu Rödfärg contains pigment from the mineralization of the Falun Mine. Red mull is created from ore with a low copper content that has decomposed over a long period. In addition to copper, red mull contains a rare composition of iron ochre, silicon dioxide and zinc, which together have a protective effect on timber.

The mull is washed, sifted and roasted, after which it is ground to a fine pigment and boiled into a paint. Burning takes place at different temperatures to produce Light red, Red or Black pigment. This results in a paint with a beautiful, matt finish and a translucent surface with course silicon dioxide crystals that reflect rays of light. In warm evening light, the red colour becomes intense and almost glows.

Reviews

Customer Reviews 1 item(s)

Great to use ... lasts incredibly well!
It's great stuff to use and lasts incredibly well. Review by Simon Wardle / (Posted on 17/08/2016)